Allison's Book Bag

Bird and Squirrel on the Run by James Burks

Posted on: May 8, 2013

It pays to make friends with your local librarian. They might lend you silly books! After chatting with our school librarian about my current reading project of graphic novels, she lent me one of her favorites: Bird and Squirrel on the Run by James Burks. It’s hilarious and cute.

Bird and Squirrel on the Run features three main characters, of which I am most unlike Bird. When Bird first shows up on the pages, he’s flying around singing about what a wonderful day it is and greeting everyone he meets. Haven’t we all met perky people like this? Next thing Bird is getting Squirrel into trouble AND joking their way out of trouble. Ah, wouldn’t I love to achieve this finesse? Later, when Bird and Squirrel decide hitting the road is their safest option, Bird never falters in his optimism. The two can fly, they can walk, they can sleep under the stars…. What I admire most about Bird is that even when Squirrel shoots down all of Bird’s ideas, Bird is not fazed. Nope, instead he asks a most sensible question: “So, what’s it going to be? Hit the open road with me or stay here and starve to death?” In asking this question, Bird proves that those “the sun is always shining” people have their use: they also keep the rest of going, going, going when all we see is clouds. Yay, for our positive friends!

The character who I most resemble is Squirrel. When Bird first meets Squirrel, he asks, “Who are you hiding from?” Squirrel not only tells him Cat, but also elaborates: “Don’t you know cats are responsible for 47 percent of all squirrel deaths in a year?” See, Squirrel not only knows his fears, but he has well thought out reasons for those fears. There’s more. When Bird asks Squirrel to hang out, Squirrel tells him in no uncertain terms, “I’ve got work to do.” And, yes, Squirrel follows up with an explanation. “Winter is almost here and if I don’t store up enough food … I’ll STARVE!” See, Squirrel not only knows what chores he needs to do, but he has logical explanations why they’re more important than enjoying a beautiful day. Last example! After everything goes wrong, Squirrel has all these super fantastic excuses for not joining Bird: He doesn’t like to travel; New things give him stomachaches; He has a fear of meteorites. Not only am I Squirrel, but many of my students are. They will so relate to Squirrel and yet (I suspect) find him so silly because of all his many, many, many fears. Incidentally, my husband admires me because of my strong work ethic, but I love him because of his spontaneous ways.

BirdSquirrelSpread

Then there’s Cat. Shh! Don’t tell our foster dog, but I see a little of Cat in him. 🙂 Our foster dog has a stubborn streak in him when it comes to getting what he wants. And so does Cat! It doesn’t matter where Bird and Squirrel lead him, but Cat is determined to hunt them down. He falls into a waterfall, ventures into a thunderstorm, waits outside a mole hole…. anything in the name of catching Bird and Squirrel. Cat also has a scary big mouth, big teeth, big eyes. In that way he’s different from our foster dog, although our foster dog does have a disgruntled growl. At this point, I’ll end the comparisons because I want the best for our foster dog, but am not so sure I feel the same about that nasty Cat.

Hmm, now that I have reread Bird and Squirrel on the Run, I might just have to delay returning it to our librarian. I can think of some fifth-grade boys who will find this graphic novel a hoot. They might also like trying to draw the characters, for which instructions can be found on Burks’ website. What a delightful loan!

My rating? Bag it: Carry it with you. Make it a top priority to read.

How would you rate this book?

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2 Responses to "Bird and Squirrel on the Run by James Burks"

Thanks for the compliment and the loan!

So glad you found these two characters as lovable in their eccentricities as I did! Wonderful review!

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Summer Reviews

Books can take connect us with strangers, take us to unique places, and introduce us to new ideas. They can also offer hope in a chaotic world. And so I must share what I read!

Each week, I’ll introduce you to religious books, Advanced Reader Copies, animal books, or diversity books. Some I’ll review as singles and others as part of round-ups. Just ahead, there will be reviews of:

  • Joni: The unforgettable story of a young woman’s struggle against quadriplegia & depression by Joni Eareckson
  • The True Story of the World’s Most Beloved Animal Sanctuary by Samantha Glen
  • Brothers in hope : the story of the Lost Boys of Sudan–refugees by Mary Williams
  • The Inner Life of Cats by Thomas McNamee

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