Allison's Book Bag

Archive for the ‘Humor’ Category

When looking for books to read, a perfect place to start is with the award-winners. They’re available for all ages and in all genres. Here are three recent ones.

We Are Growing by Laurie Keller bursts with the exuberance one would expect of a winner of the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award. Such exuberance is also perhaps the only way an author could comically write about such a mundane topic as grass. Each blade of grass is growing and proud of being the tallest, the curliest, or the silliest. But one long piece of grass doesn’t know what’s special about him until a lawn mower reduces them to the same size. Through googly-eyed grasses and slapstick moments, Keller gently teaches that we’re all the best at something.

Jean-Michel Basquiat grew up drawing with the support of his mom, who would lie with him to draw on old work papers. From her, Basquiat learned that art is found not just in museums and theaters but also in the games he played and the people he met. Basquiat overcame serious injuries suffered when he was struck by a car at age seven, and the institutionalization of his mom at age 13 to become a famous artist. Steptoe captures Basquiat’s life in his rich writing style and creative illustrations. To give meaning to the book’s artwork, Steptoe collected bits of scrap wood from around Basquiat’s home in New York City, and used them as canvases onto which he painted scenes from his book. He also adeptly integrates Basquiat’s favorite motifs into his illustrations. Radiant Child by Javaka Steptoe is a brilliant Caldecott-winner biography!

Entrenched in fantasy, complex characters, and poignant themes, The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill is impossible to put down. Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch that lives in the forest. But nothing is at is seems in this Newbery-winning novel. For example, the witch is kind. She rescues the children and delivers them to welcoming families on the other side of the forest. One year, the witch discovers one of the children possesses magic and decides to raise Luna as her own. But the baby’s mother is searching for her. And the mother meets a man who is determined to free his people from the witch. Eventually, all paths intersect with a message of love.

Graphic novels have grown in popularity over the past decade. In some libraries, the hottest children’s books are often graphic novels. Here are three graphic novel recommendations for different ages groups.

The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard features a young boy who finds himself whisked back to the 16th century England while exploring an abandoned theater. He emerges on the stage of the Globe Theatre in the middle of a performance, much to the chagrin of William Shakespeare himself. A chase erupts, wherein the young boy frees and then befriends both a caged bear and an imprisoned baron. Kids and their parents will want to study the detailed illustrations to get the most out of this wordless paneled graphic novel.

Lunch Lady and the Cyborg Substitute, the first title in the Lunch Lady series, introduces an uncover hero who assumes the guise of a lunch lady. A group of school friends who call themselves the Breakfast Bunch take a stand against bullies, agonize over what clubs to join, laugh at each other’s food choices, and debate who should win Teacher of the Year award. One day they follow the Lunch Lady home to see what she does when not serving meals. This leads to them teaming up with the Lunch Lady, her sidekick, and their crime-fighting gadgets against a suspicious substitute teacher. Mayhem abounds in this fast-paced madcap adventure, which has been a hit with both boys and girls.

For older readers comes the autobiographical novel called Smile. It tells of Raina who just wants to be a normal sixth-grader, but one night after Girl Scouts she trips and falls, damaging her two front teeth. This seemingly simple incident leads to years of agonizing over braces, headgear, surgery, and even a retainer with fake teeth. As if all this wasn’t already enough, Raina must maneuver her way through the confusion of changing friendships, dating, and self-identity. Although Smile takes place in the 1980’s, it still feels fresh. Anyone who has experienced the pain of dental work and adolescent angst will relate. Just as important, the novel will resonate with anyone who has ever struggled to find their creative voice.

Reprinted with permission from Lincoln Kids. This article is original in content and not to be reproduced without permission. Copyright 2018.

This winter I asked parents to share the titles of their children’s favorite books. Below are three. To share your own recommendations, post in the comments of email me at: allisonsbookbag@outlook.com

Munch! by Matthew Van Fleet is a colorful board book with tabs and textures that animate a cast of frolicking critters who show your kids that mouths are for more than eating food. The animals use their mouths to laugh, hiccup, smile, pout, and so much more. My favorite interactive tab is the one that makes the busy beaver chew his tree branch! Said one mother, “The book is sturdy, the text is easy to add fun vocal inflections to, and the illustrations hold the interest of babies with short attention spans.”

We’re Going on A Book Hunt is a picture book about bears that teaches kids how to select just the right book. The way to start reading a book and raise a finger for each word you don’t know. If you get to all five fingers raised, it means the book is too hard. Author Pat Miller also teaches readers to be considerate library users. Her enthusiastic bears arrive quietly, use shelf markers, turn pages carefully, and remember to return their borrowed books. Young readers will be engaged by Miller’s catchy verse, which she modeled after the popular action rhyme “We’re Going on a Bear Hunt”. About this writing, one mom wrote: “The rhythm is the best and you can change your voice to reflect the moods!

The Kingdom of Wrenly is a fantasy chapter book series by Jordan Quinn with easy-to-read text and with illustrations on almost every page. In the first book, The Lost Stone, Prince Lucas is lonely and wishes for a friend, but his parents forbid him to play with other children in the kingdom. When Lucas returns home after running away and hiding out in a village school, his parents relent and allow him to play with Clara Gills, the daughter of a seamstress for the royal family. Lucas and Clara get the chance to explore other lands when they team up to find his mother’s missing emerald pendant. Said one mother, “This is a good beginning chapter book series that my girls love to read on their own.”

Reprinted with permission from Lincoln Kids. This article is original in content and not to be reproduced without permission. Copyright 2018.

Alphabet books are popular because they are good at teaching letters. With so many available, how do you choose between them? Click Clack ABC by Doreen Cronin introduces ABCs through a fast-paced story about farm animals preparing for a picnic. At times, the style is so frenetic that the plot is hard to follow. By drawing on characters from her best-selling picture books, Cronin ensures readers will feel comfortable. She also infuses clever alliteration. The result is a fun and educational tale.

From Alyssa Capucilli comes Biscuit, a sweet yellow puppy. Ten of his innocent and charming adventures have been collected into a sturdy cloth-bound book titled Biscuit Storybook Collection. Part of the I Can Read imprint, these stories are perfect for new and emergent readers, while also enjoyable for adults. The plot has a formulaic style that sometimes results in a forced twist. Nonetheless, I wanted to pull Biscuit right out of the pages and cuddle him. Even when he causes trouble, he’s such a winsome puppy. Biscuit tries repeatedly to please his young owner and doesn’t have a mean bone in his small body. His antics are irresistible!

Humor, mystery, and romance abound in two titles by Sarah Weeks: Pie and Honey. The titles are also unified by themes of family, death, and pets. In Pie, Alice’s Aunt Polly takes her world-famous pie crust recipe to her grave. Or does she? The search for the lost recipe leads one person to ransack Polly’s shop, another person to steal her cat, and another to question residents. In Honey, Melody doesn’t mind not having a mother until she overhears her dad call someone ‘Honey’. Has her dad fallen in love with someone? Who could it be? No one will answer these questions. Nor will they talk about her mom. Melody’s story alternates with a story of a dog that has concerns of his own. When secrets are revealed in both titles, lives are forever changed.

Reprinted with permission from Lincoln Kids. This article is original in content and not to be reproduced without permission. Copyright 2017.

Friendship is a central theme that runs through the following three books. Friends can help us through challenges and to solve problems. While working through our differences isn’t always easy, friends fill our lives with happiness.

Sophie and Friends is part of a touch-and-feel durable board book series for readers ages three months to three years. The story is sweet and the illustrations are cute, but there isn’t much to touch.  Sophie the giraffe and her five friends like doing things together: Lazare the cat lives to make everyone laugh, Kiwi the bird enjoys baking cookies, Margot the turtle loves to jump over puddles, Josephine the mouse likes to hide, and Gabin the bear treasures bedtime stories. Although some of the other books in this series have pop-ups and more textures, readers will still enjoy exploring the fabrics in Sophie and Friends. They’ll also like the fun adventures.

The simplicity of Jon Klassen’s design and the deadpan humor underlying his stories never fail to entertain. In We Found a Hat, two turtles find a hat. The problem is there’s just one hat, and they both want the hat. The friends agree that the hat looks equally good on them, but it’d be wrong for one to have the hat, and so the solution is to forget about the hat. Easier said than done! Aimed at readers ages four to eight, the story encourages reading independence with only one sentence per page. In addition, this 54-page story has been smartly divided into chapters, which heightens the suspense. The ending is perfect.

Readers of the classic Ramona books need look no further than Clementine by Sara Pennypacker for another lovably-rambunctious character. Clementine’s week hasn’t been going so well. She’s been sent to the principal’s office for cutting off her friend’s hair. Margaret’s mom has refused to allow the two girls to be alone together. The disastrous week is made worse partly because of the effort Clementine puts into making everything right again, including trying to glue Margaret’s hair back on and offering to sacrifice her own hair. Like Ramona, nothing Clementine does comes from a mean heart, but rather from a creative mind. Clementine is quirky, hilarious, and unforgettable.

Reprinted with permission from Lincoln Kids. This article is original in content and not to be reproduced without permission. Copyright 2017.


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2018

I am focusing this year on other commitments. Once a month, I’ll post reviews of Advanced Reader Copies. Titles will include: Freddy Frogcaster and the Flash Flood by Janice Dean, One Two by Igor Eliseev, Incredible Magic of Being by Kathyrn Erskine, Dragon Grammar Book by Diane Robinson, and Wide as the Wind by Edward Stanton.

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