Allison's Book Bag

Mariana Weber is so passionate about global warming that she used to regularly write letters to the president. Then she realized that his replies were all the same and that a co-worker had probably drafted a form letter for such requests as hers. Undeterred, Mariana decided to both form an organization for environmental protection and to write a book. For the latter, she enlisted her illustrator friend Joanna Whysner, whose colorful drawings add to the charm of The Global Warming Express.

Through an easy-to-read fantasy, Weber entertains while also making a plea for change. Earth is in peril. Several animals and two young people decide to join forces. They ride a magical train to the White House, where they hope their cry will be heard by the president.

The adventure begins in Antarctica, where an emperor penguin named The Fluff has just lost his mom, who died after swallowing a piece of plastic from the ocean. The girls also meet other animals whose stories engage while also drawing upon sympathies: a harp seal named Creamy who almost drowned when the ice she called home melted before she could learn to swim, a bear named Tomas and a salamander named Sally whose homes have been destroyed by fires caused by drought, a polar bear named Flora who found herself separated from her parents due to melting ice, a mountain goat named Edgar who has nowhere left to migrate, a caribou named Lauren who has no place to call home due to the destruction of muskeg, a duck named Zolo whose feathers have been permanently damaged by oil, a fish named Bobbi Sue whose aquatic home is toxic, and a rat named Zingo whose home is being destroyed by hurricanes that have become increasingly severe. One would be hard-pressed to read the tales of all these animals and not be stirred to action.

Weber has done her research. In her introduction, she explains why the Earth is heating up and why we need to slow down the effects. Through a parrot named Inoah, she teaches reading about multiple issues related to global warming such as the burning of fossil fuels, drilling of natural preserves, releasing of carbon monoxide into the air, and dumping of oils. And, on her resources page, Weber provides multiple links to articles and websites related to climate change. Anyone who is stirred to action by The Global Warming Express will have obvious reasons and solutions.

The Global Warming Express isn’t simply a cautionary tale. It’s also a fun story of a cross-country adventure where several animals and two young people visit unfamiliar places and face dangers such as fires and hurricanes. One minor complaint is I’m not sure why the train takes them into Canada, given that their mission is to plead with the United States president to pass environmental protection laws. While on this ride, the train becomes a character too. If the passengers are sad it slows down and even stops, but if the passengers are happy it speeds up.

In addition to writing a book, Weber started The Global Warming Express program. Its website explains global warming, tells how adults can help, and provides updates on small and big goals that young people in the group have made towards climate change.

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This winter I asked parents to share the titles of their children’s favorite books. Below are three. To share your own recommendations, post in the comments of email me at: allisonsbookbag@outlook.com

Munch! by Matthew Van Fleet is a colorful board book with tabs and textures that animate a cast of frolicking critters who show your kids that mouths are for more than eating food. The animals use their mouths to laugh, hiccup, smile, pout, and so much more. My favorite interactive tab is the one that makes the busy beaver chew his tree branch! Said one mother, “The book is sturdy, the text is easy to add fun vocal inflections to, and the illustrations hold the interest of babies with short attention spans.”

We’re Going on A Book Hunt is a picture book about bears that teaches kids how to select just the right book. The way to start reading a book and raise a finger for each word you don’t know. If you get to all five fingers raised, it means the book is too hard. Author Pat Miller also teaches readers to be considerate library users. Her enthusiastic bears arrive quietly, use shelf markers, turn pages carefully, and remember to return their borrowed books. Young readers will be engaged by Miller’s catchy verse, which she modeled after the popular action rhyme “We’re Going on a Bear Hunt”. About this writing, one mom wrote: “The rhythm is the best and you can change your voice to reflect the moods!

The Kingdom of Wrenly is a fantasy chapter book series by Jordan Quinn with easy-to-read text and with illustrations on almost every page. In the first book, The Lost Stone, Prince Lucas is lonely and wishes for a friend, but his parents forbid him to play with other children in the kingdom. When Lucas returns home after running away and hiding out in a village school, his parents relent and allow him to play with Clara Gills, the daughter of a seamstress for the royal family. Lucas and Clara get the chance to explore other lands when they team up to find his mother’s missing emerald pendant. Said one mother, “This is a good beginning chapter book series that my girls love to read on their own.”

Reprinted with permission from Lincoln Kids. This article is original in content and not to be reproduced without permission. Copyright 2018.

From the ravaged tiny Polynesian island of Vaitea arises a hero and heroine for our times. Based on his ten years of Easter Island research, Edward Stanton has written an inspiring adventure about a brother and sister, their island, and how they saved it. In Wide as the Wind, Miru and Renga face tough choices and much hardship when they set sail to a distant island to find the seeds and shoots of trees that could reforest their homeland. Their return to Vaitea reaps romance and additional challenges in this teen historical novel.

Adventure is at the forefront of this tightly-written novel. Prior to embarking on their journey, Miru and Renga learn the sailor’s craft. Their grandfather teaches them to weave sails of pounded bark, cut full-sized paddles, make nets of mulberry cloth, and fashion birdbone hooks. He also teaches them to coast the island in a longboat, navigate by the sun, moon, and stars, recognize winds, currents, and constellations, and to fish. After recruiting a third crewman, the brother and sister duo set sail. On their journey, they brave the elements. The wind gusts. The sea roars. Supplies are washed overboard. The sun burns, parching their throats. They encounter sharks and their third crewman is attacked. Miru, Renga, and their third crewsman sail fifty-two days before finding land, and this is just the beginning of their adventure.

At the heart of Wide as the Wind also lies a theme. Years of tribal wars have devastated Vaitea. Tribes people who survived are now facing starvation. To save them, Miru must personally sacrifice romantic love, suffer injury and loss, and even risk his life. Even when they return from their journey to a distant island with the seeds and shoots of trees necessary to reforest their homeland, the tribal wars threaten to continue. Although some historical accounts suggest that extinction of natural resources of the real-life Easter Island inhabitants started long before internal conflicts, the latter certainly didn’t help. In basing his story on a real place, Stanton has crafted a parable that shows how mankind’s violence can lead to environmental destruction and even the end of a world.

Wide as the Wind has many other positives. The characters are realistic. Miru and Renga are likeable teens to which every reader can relate. Miru disagrees with his father’s choices, enjoys swimming with dolphins, and sneaks away to spend time with his girlfriend. The descriptions are vivid; the diction is strong. Here’s just one phrase for example: “He sat down with them on paving stones that glittered with brine and fish scales….” There are even moments of humor. One of the funniest is when birds poop on Miru’s head, just after he’s received the call to save his people. My one complaint is that I felt at times the action moved too fast and kept me at an emotional distance from the characters.

Author Edward Stanton has written eleven books. His fiction, poems, and essays have appeared in publications across the world. He is a professor of literature, and has won grants for his travel, research, and writing. Wide as the Wind is a worthy addition to his literary accomplishments. It has won the 2017 silver Moonbeam Award for Young Adult Fiction and the 2018 silver Feathered Quill Award for Teen Fiction.

Celebrate Love Your Pet Day on February 20 with Ralphie Always Loved by Andrea Yerramilli. This colorful and upbeat picture book will win the hearts of everyone who loves dogs, enjoys dog rescue stories, and is a child at heart. My Advanced Reader Copy even came with a bookmark and a bandana. The story was inspired by the author’s real dog.

Yerramilli adds a whimsical touch to what could otherwise have been an overly sentimental story. The story has a fun start, with Ralphie being in heaven, where the angels in heaven are busily painting puffy white clouds on a clear blue sky. He wants to help and so dips first his tail, then his paws, and even his tail into the paint. The result is a mess, but God just laughs and grants him the wish of visiting earth. Yerramilli recognizes the reality of dog relinquishment. Three owners in a row gave him up to a shelter. Rather than dwell on the negative, Yerramilli chooses to focus on the positive. Ralphie was still young when he found his forever home, one where he grows old and knows that he’ll always be loved.

Through the power of words and fiction, Yerramilli models what a lifetime commitment to a pet should look like. After three strike-outs, Ralphie was adopted by a couple who want him as a companion for them and their older dog. The couple doesn’t care that Ralphie has a lot to learn, but rather teach him good manners. Nor do the couple give him up after having a baby, but instead they gave Ralphie time to find new ways to love. Whatever changes came into their life, even that of their first dog dying of old age, the couple ensure Ralphie remains part of their family.

The illustrations are done by Samantha Van Riet and are just as heart-warming as the story. She lavishes each page with warm and bright colors. One of my favorites is a yellow-framed portrait of Ralphie. God has just dipped his finger into paint and drawn a heart on Ralphie. The watercolor backdrop is a lovely blend of purple, blue, and yellow. Another favorite of mine depicts gray-haired Ralphie with a bone. Next to him are a montage of fond memories of times with family.

The real Ralphie was diagnosed with cancer at age 16 and recently crossed Rainbow Bridge. Read more about his true adventures at 16 year old Ralphie Loves Every Human and Animal He Meets.

Now an annual tradition here at Allison’s Book Bag, what follows is my tribute to those authors for young people whose died this last year. I’m not familiar with the writings of Amy Krouse Rosenthal, but grew up reading Michael Bond and Paula Fox. I have the complete Paddington Bear series, and even a Paddington Bear doll.

After the photo collage, you’ll find a list of the featured authors. If the author had a website, I added the link to the author’s name. Besides the name is a description of the works that made the author famous. On the next line, I added a photo credit. If I’ve reviewed any books by the author, I added a note in the third paragraph, along with any relevant links.

NorahMcClintock

Michael Bond is the English children’s author who created the beloved Paddington Bear. While working as a television cameraman for the BBC, he first came up with the idea for Paddington. He bought a small toy bear on Christmas Eve 1956 as a present for my wife Brenda and named it Paddington because they were living near Paddington Station at the time. He wrote some stories about the bear, more for fun than with the idea of having them published, and within days he had completed a book. In addition to the Paddington bear series, he wrote a television series The Herbs, books about a guinea pig called Olga da Polga and adult novels about a French detective turned food guide inspector. In total Michael Bond wrote almost 150 books, including his autobiography ‘Bears and Forebears’ that now is a collector’s item.
Photo Credit: Paddington.com, Micheal Bond the Creator of Paddington.
You can read my review of one of his books here: Paddington Here and Now

Paula Fox is best known for her children’s book “The Slave Dancer” which won the 1974 Newbery Medal. Based on historical accounts, it tells the tale of a white 13-year-old boy who witnessed first-hand the African slave trade. He is put on board a slave ship to play his pipe for slaves forced to “dance” as exercise. A Place Apart won a US National Book award and One-Eyed Cat was a Newbery Honor winner. Fox was awarded the Hans Christian Andersen Award, the highest international award for children’s literature, in 1978.
Photo Credit: GoodReads Paula Fox

Norah McClintock was a bestselling Canadian writer of young adult fiction. Her first book, Shakespeare and Legs, was published in 1987 and she continued to write prolifically until she became a full-time writer in 2000. Though that first book was a teen romance, McClintock became most famous for her crime fiction. She wrote more than 60 books for young readers, including the popular Robyn Hunter mysteries, Chloe & Levesque mysteries and the Mike & Riel mysteries. McClintock was the only female writer to contribute to Orca’s popular Seven Series and Seven Sequels. She won five Arthur Ellis Awards for crime fiction for young people.
Photo Credit: GoodReads Paula Fox

Amy Krouse Rosenthal, a prolific children’s book author, as best known for her many children’s books, including “Duck! Rabbit!” “I Wish You More,” and “Uni the Unicorn,” among others. Amy’s Poehler’s Smart Girls features Rosenthal.
Photo Credit: Twitter

The above list is based on searching many web pages for reports about those young people’s authors we lost in 2017. If you know of others I missed, please add them in the comments. Thank you!

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2018

I am focusing this year on other commitments. Once a month, I’ll post reviews of Advanced Reader Copies. Titles will include: Freddy Frogcaster and the Flash Flood by Janice Dean, One Two by Igor Eliseev, Incredible Magic of Being by Kathyrn Erskine, Dragon Grammar Book by Diane Robinson, and Wide as the Wind by Edward Stanton.

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