Allison's Book Bag

Current Read #34: A Sacred Sorrow

Posted on: November 24, 2015

SacredSorrow“Why is this happening, God?” “How long will you wait to intervene, Lord?” “Where are you?” According to A Sacred Sorrow by Michael Card, all of these are questions that were posed at some point by Biblical heroes. Having experienced a lot of sadness over the past few years, along with hearing of tragedy and even evil repeatedly in the news, this book has personal significance to me.

In the first few chapters, Card defines lament and discusses its place in the Christian’s life. Card talks about how we have lost the language that accepts suffering and how we need to find it again, because it’s an inherent part of our relationship with God. From our earliest days, we’re taught to control our tears and that of others, so in that way we might control pain. Card claims that instead lament is the path of true worship of God. Lament will help us heal, show us how to reach out to others, and allow us to develop intimacy with God.

The bulk of the remaining chapters focus on four Biblical heroes who expressed lament: David, Job, Jeremiah, and Jesus. Second king of Israel, David faced many sufferings including initially being overlooked as a candidate for God’s anointed, then being on the run as an outlaw, and even having his own children revolt against him. As for the prophet, Jeremiah, he accused God of being unfair. Jeremiah felt that God called him into service, only to have no one listen to or understand him. Using Biblical heroes as examples, Card show how we can find hope in troubled times.

Rounding out A Sacred Sorrow is an abundance of additional information on lament. There’s a list of all characters in the Bible who expressed sorrow, quotes from religious individuals from outside of the Bible, selected Davidic laments, and even a section on how to journal as part of lament. Readers are encouraged to grieve in God, but also to recall the blessings of God, and therefore to find fulfillment in God.

In my introduction, I wrote that A Sacred Sorrow has personal significance to me. I had reached the place in my Christian walk, where I felt questions and doubts but lacked any answers or joy. Ironically, by allowing myself to cry and vent, I begin to find my faith renewed. Since reading A Sacred Sorrow, I’ve even started a Biblical study of my own on the topic. If you’re looking for a new way to grow in God, A Sacred Sorrow should be on your reading list.

This post is part of the Musing Mondays line-up. Check out others by clicking on the below graphic.

MusingMondays

Advertisements

4 Responses to "Current Read #34: A Sacred Sorrow"

After reading your review, I read Wikipedia’s article on Michael Card, where I found that “Sacred Sorrow” won a Gold Medallion Book Award from the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association, and browsed the reviews of “Sacred Sorrow” at Amazon, where I found that it has a 4.9/5 rating. Your review would be a worthy addition to them.

Thank you for reminding me I need to post my review at Amazon and GoodReads. 🙂 Would you like to borrow my copy of Sacred Sorrow to read when I visit?

Sounds like a great read.

Have a fabulous day. ☺

A Sacred Sorrow inspired me to write an article. I’ve also put other books by Micheal Card on my wish list.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Allisons' Book Bag Logo

Summer Reviews

Books can take connect us with strangers, take us to unique places, and introduce us to new ideas. They can also offer hope in a chaotic world. And so I must share what I read!

Each week, I’ll introduce you to religious books, Advanced Reader Copies, animal books, or diversity books. Some I’ll review as singles and others as part of round-ups. Just ahead, there will be reviews of:

  • Joni: The unforgettable story of a young woman’s struggle against quadriplegia & depression by Joni Eareckson
  • The True Story of the World’s Most Beloved Animal Sanctuary by Samantha Glen
  • Brothers in hope : the story of the Lost Boys of Sudan–refugees by Mary Williams
  • The Inner Life of Cats by Thomas McNamee

Categories

Archives

Cat Writers’ Association
Artists Helping Animals

IAABC

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 313 other followers

%d bloggers like this: